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Paint Mixing Chart


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#1 GMobile17

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 09:54 AM

I'm wondering if anyone has or know of a paint mixing chart for the basic colors such as for red, green, blue, and maybe black/white? I know most people knows by head and do it by eye, but would be helpful if there is a chart that shows maybe the estimate in percentage of what colors to mix to get a certain color.

Thanks
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#2 ssgtdude

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 10:17 AM

http://home.att.net/...IO/ARTPAINT.htm

Here ya go

#3 GMobile17

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 10:23 AM

Thanks... I still wonder if there is some more advantage colors? I'm going nuts trying to figure out that weird blue for that EZ8 Gundam and also some colors for some other models.
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#4 ssgtdude

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 10:32 AM

View PostGMobile17, on Jan 17 2007, 04:23 AM, said:

Thanks... I still wonder if there is some more advantage colors? I'm going nuts trying to figure out that weird blue for that EZ8 Gundam and also some colors for some other models.
take the peice in to a hardware store and see if they can give you a formula for the mixing of the color.  A lot of these places will do a digital color matching

#5 GMobile17

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 11:14 AM

Great idea... I'll see which place I can go to for that.

I really think someone should come out with a software program for these things. Like a program that you can scan or select a color and it'll give you at least an estimate of what primary colors, such as red/green/blue/black/white, to mix with what percentages. That would be awesome.
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#6 thor777

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 11:19 AM

http://www.colorblender.com

#7 misato-chan

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 10:49 AM

The thing is that to get certain shades you have to use "different " primary colors. Like: I needed a nice lilac for Memoru hair and I was lucky enough to find it at the first trial. You'd say, use red, blue and some white, right? Well, I got it mixing only some Magenta and some Turquoise!
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#8 Sakuya

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 02:42 AM

View PostGMobile17, on Jan 16 2007, 07:14 PM, said:

Great idea... I'll see which place I can go to for that.

I really think someone should come out with a software program for these things. Like a program that you can scan or select a color and it'll give you at least an estimate of what primary colors, such as red/green/blue/black/white, to mix with what percentages. That would be awesome.

They do, though unfortunately they're designed for industrial or print use and are hideously expensive. We use them every day at work, unfortunately they're stupidly bulkye being lab equipment. The problem with scanning is that the scanner will introduce colour errors into the equation the computer uses to try and colour match with. Hence the lab stuff has a very expensive measuring sphere to capture all the colour data. Quite often a seasoned colourist can get a better idea of what makes a match than the machine can.

Ssgtude was spot on with his suggestion. Most hardware stores that offer in-can mixing have a cheaper variant that will closely match the colour of the item you give them. It won't be perfect but with a couple of exceptions (some pigment colours just physically cannot be matched without using that specific pigment in the first place) it will be pretty close.

Persuading the operator to tell you what colours were needed to match it is a different issue, especially if you don't want a big tin of house paint <_<

#9 steambeat

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 10:16 AM

View PostSakuya, on Jan 18 2007, 04:42 AM, said:

View PostGMobile17, on Jan 16 2007, 07:14 PM, said:

Great idea... I'll see which place I can go to for that.

I really think someone should come out with a software program for these things. Like a program that you can scan or select a color and it'll give you at least an estimate of what primary colors, such as red/green/blue/black/white, to mix with what percentages. That would be awesome.

They do, though unfortunately they're designed for industrial or print use and are hideously expensive. We use them every day at work, unfortunately they're stupidly bulkye being lab equipment. The problem with scanning is that the scanner will introduce colour errors into the equation the computer uses to try and colour match with. Hence the lab stuff has a very expensive measuring sphere to capture all the colour data. Quite often a seasoned colourist can get a better idea of what makes a match than the machine can.

Ssgtude was spot on with his suggestion. Most hardware stores that offer in-can mixing have a cheaper variant that will closely match the colour of the item you give them. It won't be perfect but with a couple of exceptions (some pigment colours just physically cannot be matched without using that specific pigment in the first place) it will be pretty close.

Persuading the operator to tell you what colours were needed to match it is a different issue, especially if you don't want a big tin of house paint <_<


If you know someone that works at a sherman williams they used to have these binders that where filled with charts. It basicly showed employees what colors you got when you mixed there stock paints. It was useful because of how it was layed out.

It showed what colors you got from mixing the primaries, then in the second teer what new colors you got when you added more primaries to these.




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