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Completely Eliminating Orange Peel without Sanding


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#1 BuBoy

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:36 AM

One thing that irritates me about using airbrush is that the "orange peel" has been an inevitable and unwanted effect. Many modelers advised sanding with fine grit to eliminate this, but I found this to be a quite tedious and very frustrating chore. Sanding always gets rid of some portions of the paint, and makes the hue of the color uneven.

In b4, I've also tried using a high thinner:paint ratio and added retarder to my paint mix. I want to ask what went wrong with what I've been doing. And yeah please tell me more things I can do to make thins better for this particular problem.

Many thanks to you folks!

#2 RoboSmurf

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:58 AM

I dont think its inevitable, as I dont have a problem with it.

Questions for you: AB type, PSI setting, Paint and thinner type plus ratio.

You might be spraying to far away or at to high a psi, causeing the paint to set before it gets to the part.
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#3 ucangler

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 12:59 PM

paint too think

#4 electric_indigo

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 03:14 PM

Main reason is that the paint is not thinned enough, but you also should apply a "wet" coat, i.e. the amount of paint on an area should be high enough to form a uniform surface, just before actually forming drops, but not so high that is obscures all the fine details on a surface. Sounds like tricky business? It is. Also, do not spray over a surface again that has just been painted. Let it dry, then apply a second coat.
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#5 CadillacPat

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 11:56 PM

I'd have to agree with RoboSmurf here.
I can't agree that too thick would give you orange peel and I certainly don't agree that going over wet paint will cause it.

Fact is using an AirBrush will give you total control over your paintjob, not create invevitable errors.

I've painted thousands of Custom Diecast cars and never had orange peel.
I also never sand in between coats or even on my final Clearcoat.

Laying down wetcoats by overlapping your strokes 50% will achieve a nice smooth wetcoat effect.
Body prep and proper priming are mandatory.
Paint compatability is a must.

Are you getting orange peel on everything you ever paint??

What products are you using, i.e., primer, paint, thinner/reducer.

Why are you using a high paint thinner ratio?
You shouldn't exceed limits which produce watery colors.

Are your paints old?

Thinning of paints depends on viscosity and richness of pigment.

Why are you using a retarder?
Again, what products are you using?
What is this "b4" you mention??

More info needed.

Airbrushing is a very simple procedure and normally yields perfect results unless acted upon by some outside force.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
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#6 BuBoy

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 08:45 AM

View PostCadillacPat, on Feb 11 2009, 03:56 PM, said:

Are you getting orange peel on everything you ever paint??

What products are you using, i.e., primer, paint, thinner/reducer.

Why are you using a high paint thinner ratio?

Are your paints old?

Why are you using a retarder?

More info needed.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
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- Yes, I get it everytime I do an airbush job.

- Primer: Mr Base White 1000
  Paint: Mr Color/Tamiya Spray (decanted)
  Thinner: Mr Color Thinner

- I really meant high thinner to paint ratio

- No, the can's bought a few weeks ago. Decanted only before using it.

- I thought using a retarder stunts its drying time, making the wet particles spread more evenly.

Thanks for asking. They might really help.

Cheers!

#7 PetarB

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 07:50 PM

Primer: Mr Base White isn't really the best primer (in fact I don't think its 'really' a primer, I could be wrong) I use it for laying down a nice white, but I haven't tried, say, priming resin with it. You should try Tamiya's Fine White primer, it's possibly one of the best primers available.

Paint: Yikes, decanted spray. Probably the 'source' of most of your issues.  Haven't used Mr Colour for a while, but I know the Tamiya spray - which is a lacquer - is very, very easy to orange peel, as its rather thick. Lacquer based paints, in my experience - are one of the harder paints to 'get right'. You should try Tamiya or Vallejo or Mr Hobby acrylics in the little tubs, thinned with their respective thinners, or 'Windex' windscreen wiper fluid.

Thinner: This may be the other 'source' of your issues. I'm not sure if Mr Colour Thinner is compatible with the lacquer based paints you mention. Others here with more experience with Lacquer based paints will probably chime in.

Retarder: I can't speak for everyone, but I've never needed a retarder, even with a very high-gloss finish - which is what they are generally used for. But I know people use them. I usually achieve a high gloss finish by overcoats of Future or other clear paints. Some people who live in very hot, dry areas need to use them just because of the climate.

The orangle peel effect is not inevitable. In fact, the only time I've ever experienced it is using Tamiya lacquers straight from the can....!

Best of luck.  :D

#8 CadillacPat

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 07:51 AM

BuBoy,
Your Base White is a Base Color, a main or background color laid down over primer.

Paint removed from an Aerosol can is just paint.
It was paint before it went in the can and it is just paint when it comes out.
It would never be the source of any problems.
Aerosol cans are okay for lawn furniture but removing the paint from the can will give you total control over it.
Here's just a portion of 850 '69 Camaros done with Duplicolor Anodized Metalcast removed from the can and AirBrushed.
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Since your spraying on your Base Coat without using a Primer this might be your problem.

I've used Tamiya paints and never had problems.

--CadillacPat the UnCustomizer--
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#9 Cubic-X

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 12:02 AM

may be some of you will break my neck for saying these :) but well this is what i do.

Primer:
Tamiya Cans - nice surfaces but the nozzle will some times provide unstable output volume.
Mr. Color: haven't use them yet but i will try them very soon~

Motor Master Primer: extremely good! no melting or anything, bonds well and excellent for mecha model kits. (not for figures..)

Figure (resin) primer: only Mr Hobby resin primer

As for orange peel: (you mean "dim-holes" correct?)

-Thick paint (but you said this wasn't the problem)
- the spray distance (too far or too close)
- the room temperature <----- you will never understand how important this is.
- or your applying method..... you sprayed way too much on the first coat and when it dried completely then you sprayed the second coat on creating the orange peels. solution, to this is quickly use a second airbrush "MIST" as layer of very thin paint of the same color over it and let it set dry. I only use tis if i am making a big screw up.

ps. almost forgot... if you use 90%+ alcohol will give you some orange peel since it dries way too fast.
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