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how long should i wait for putty to dry


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#1 mars1r

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 06:52 PM

i am using tamiya basic putty and tamiya epoxy putty

im using the exopy putty to legthen and the basic putty is for bogging
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#2 Deku

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 06:53 PM

Just to be safe, wait 24 hours. Leave there go to sleep.

#3 kylew

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 09:10 PM

Leaving things for 24 hours is a comment made way to often. It's a complete waste of time, basic putty dries in a few hours at most.

To find out how long, just test it, keep poking a puttied area with your finger nail until it's hard and your nail doesn't mark it.

Epoxy putty should say how long it takes to dry on the box, but whenever I've used it I have had to wait 5 hours before it's cured completely.
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#4 tulipsuki

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 11:35 PM

in my case, basic putty need more than a few hours to cure, I usually leave it for 2 or 3 days

and then I got sick of waiting and go for light curing putty, dry in 3 mins :D

#5 PetarB

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 01:59 PM

 kylew, on Jul 30 2009, 03:10 PM, said:

Leaving things for 24 hours is a comment made way to often. It's a complete waste of time, basic putty dries in a few hours at most.

To find out how long, just test it, keep poking a puttied area with your finger nail until it's hard and your nail doesn't mark it.

Epoxy putty should say how long it takes to dry on the box, but whenever I've used it I have had to wait 5 hours before it's cured completely.
Probably going to have to disagree with you on just about everything in that post.

1) 24 hours is a good period of time. There is no such thing as 'basic putty'. For example, I have five different types of putty, each takes different drying times and environments.

2) Don't keep poking the puttied area... because you don't want to wreck your work!!!  Just leave it overnight to be sure. Many putties harden over a few hours, but do not reach maximum strength for a couple of days.

3) A lot of putties you use may come from Japan in which case there may not be any information on the packaging you can read. I would just leave it a day, for maximum hardness.

4) Polyester putties which need a hardener to set are very, very smelly but work really well. They dont shrink and have about an hour or two until they can be tapped, sanded, drilled, etc

5) Epoxy putties like Milliput, Aves and the Tamiya one you're using really should be left overnight, but the nice thing about them is you can smooth them down with water or alcohol beforehand, so that you hardly need to sand, if at all. Most of them mention 24-48 hours for maximum hardness.

6) One of the best putties which has only recently appeared is Tamiya Light Curing putty. You put in on in a low light environment... quickly, then expose it to sunlight and the UV light cures in 60 seconds. It's fantastic stuff, I highly recommend it. Although, its not suitable for everyone's working environment.

Have fun!

#6 ucangler

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:30 PM

hmm im looking for a new putty to use

#7 kylew

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 06:47 PM

 PetarB, on Jul 30 2009, 10:59 PM, said:

 kylew, on Jul 30 2009, 03:10 PM, said:

Leaving things for 24 hours is a comment made way to often. It's a complete waste of time, basic putty dries in a few hours at most.

To find out how long, just test it, keep poking a puttied area with your finger nail until it's hard and your nail doesn't mark it.

Epoxy putty should say how long it takes to dry on the box, but whenever I've used it I have had to wait 5 hours before it's cured completely.
Probably going to have to disagree with you on just about everything in that post.

1) 24 hours is a good period of time. There is no such thing as 'basic putty'. For example, I have five different types of putty, each takes different drying times and environments.

2) Don't keep poking the puttied area... because you don't want to wreck your work!!!  Just leave it overnight to be sure. Many putties harden over a few hours, but do not reach maximum strength for a couple of days.

3) A lot of putties you use may come from Japan in which case there may not be any information on the packaging you can read. I would just leave it a day, for maximum hardness.

4) Polyester putties which need a hardener to set are very, very smelly but work really well. They dont shrink and have about an hour or two until they can be tapped, sanded, drilled, etc

5) Epoxy putties like Milliput, Aves and the Tamiya one you're using really should be left overnight, but the nice thing about them is you can smooth them down with water or alcohol beforehand, so that you hardly need to sand, if at all. Most of them mention 24-48 hours for maximum hardness.

6) One of the best putties which has only recently appeared is Tamiya Light Curing putty. You put in on in a low light environment... quickly, then expose it to sunlight and the UV light cures in 60 seconds. It's fantastic stuff, I highly recommend it. Although, its not suitable for everyone's working environment.

Have fun!


If you read the original post, you'll understand what is meant by basic putty.

Tamiya make a putty called 'basic'. That what it was in reference to.

As for poking the putty to test if it's hard, re-read my post, because I think you have read it wrong. I said that in terms of gauging how long it takes for the putty to dry.

I wasn't recommending it to be done on a kit, but a scrap piece of plastic or something.

Everything I've said is from experience. I've been using this stuff since I was about 10 (I'm 19 now) I've used a few different epoxy putties as well as polyester putters and basic lacquer based 'glazing' type of putties.

Your time estimates are over the top. The polyester putty I use dries completely solid in 10 minutes. I can sand and carve it around 10 minutes from mixing it depending on the ratio of hardener to putty I use.

Milliput, which I've used for years, again takes no way near 24-48 hours to cure. No way at all, as I've said I've used these putties for quite a long time and everything you're saying doesn't tell me that you're talking from experience, but that you're making assumptions.

When I was 10, working with these putties I was quite impatient and I could barely wait a few hours never mind 1-2 days.

The work I did back then was terrible, but I know how long the putties take to dry. As for the lacquer based putties, I use squadron green putty, and while it's a bit different to tamiya basic, it smells exactly the same and acts the same too, I prefer it because it's green.

The instructions are in FULL english, and it directs you to let it dry for 30 mins then file or sand in to shape.

Surely I and the manufacturer aren't both wrong?

Go have a look at the milliput website, they state it takes 3-4 hours for it to set rock hard. Are they also wrong?

As I've said, I KNOW you aren't speaking from experience how could you? My experience says otherwise as well as falling in line with the manufacturers directions.

Squadron Putty Tube

There's an image of a tube of squadron putty, where it says on the rear how long it takes to cure. It's difficult to see, but if you wish I'll take a photo of the rear of my own tubes of putty.

So please don't tell me how to use putties as I've been using them a long time and what you're saying goes against the manufacturer's directions.
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#8 kylew

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:29 AM

To Mars1r, apologies for somewhat derailing the thread with my moaning.
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#9 PetarB

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 07:47 PM

 kylew, on Jul 31 2009, 12:47 PM, said:

Milliput, which I've used for years, again takes no way near 24-48 hours to cure. No way at all, as I've said I've used these putties for quite a long time and everything you're saying doesn't tell me that you're talking from experience, but that you're making assumptions.
Milliput's curing time can vary dramatically, and is a function of local temperature, and putty volume. If you are turning, tapping or machining Milliput in any way, you will need to give it a longer period of time that the 'overnight' period of time that Milliput suggests. The reason they are not specific is purely because of the points mentioned above. You mention:

 kylew, on Jul 31 2009, 12:47 PM, said:

Go have a look at the milliput website, they state it takes 3-4 hours for it to set rock hard. Are they also wrong?
No, in fact you're wrong. Since on their website, it actually says this:
"In 3-4 hours it becomes quite hard and tack free. Overnight it becomes rock hard." http://www.milliput.com/how.htm

Also, you proudly mention you're 19. Good for you! At that grand old age, I suggest you don't make assumptions about other people's experience though, as it might make for unexpected hilarity. I've been using Milliput probably longer than you've been alive  ;)

#10 mars1r

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 08:28 AM

i found that with the tamiya 'basic' putty volume does play apart with the time it cures. and the exopy putty is very sensitive to heat. after a day of leaving it to dry, it becomes maliable when sanded down.

thanks for the advice. my policy is now jus leave the fucker along and work on the other parts of the kit. and cleaning my room and coming back to it works
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#11 kylew

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 11:33 PM

 PetarB, on Aug 6 2009, 04:47 AM, said:

 kylew, on Jul 31 2009, 12:47 PM, said:

Milliput, which I've used for years, again takes no way near 24-48 hours to cure. No way at all, as I've said I've used these putties for quite a long time and everything you're saying doesn't tell me that you're talking from experience, but that you're making assumptions.
Milliput's curing time can vary dramatically, and is a function of local temperature, and putty volume. If you are turning, tapping or machining Milliput in any way, you will need to give it a longer period of time that the 'overnight' period of time that Milliput suggests. The reason they are not specific is purely because of the points mentioned above. You mention:

 kylew, on Jul 31 2009, 12:47 PM, said:

Go have a look at the milliput website, they state it takes 3-4 hours for it to set rock hard. Are they also wrong?
No, in fact you're wrong. Since on their website, it actually says this:
"In 3-4 hours it becomes quite hard and tack free. Overnight it becomes rock hard." http://www.milliput.com/how.htm

Also, you proudly mention you're 19. Good for you! At that grand old age, I suggest you don't make assumptions about other people's experience though, as it might make for unexpected hilarity. I've been using Milliput probably longer than you've been alive  ;)

I didn't once act like 19 is an old age, point being that I've used milliput for 9-10 years. Point being that I have a fair amount of experience with it, and I have observed its curing time, you can't tell me that you don't 'agree' with my experience because it's not a subjective matter. Whether you believe me or not is a different matter.

As for what you say the website says about milliput, they've contradicted themselves because upon me checking again it says both over night and 3-4 hours.

Quote

The two sticks have a long shelf life but once mixed the resultant putty is at first soft and highly adhesive and then gradually hardens. Speed of hardening is dependant on temperature and at normal temperatures (20-25ÂșC) Milliput becomes rock hard in three to four hours[b]. By the application of heat the setting time can be reduced to a few minutes.

From this page Milliput Website

I responded in a presumptuous manner because I thought that's how you responded to my post in the first place. You made assumptions of my experience, which you're now telling me not to do?  :blink:

You also failed to respond to anything else I said? I mentioned putties other than milliput, did you only respond to that because you thought you had caught me out?

Milliput was just a part of my overall post.
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#12 RoboSmurf

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 11:57 PM

I read most of the directions but I still feel more comfortable letting all my putties cure overnight. I use everything from green stuff, plumbers epoxy putty, milliput (different grades), mori mori, bondo, tamiya poly putty and tamiya basic putty.

Even though most putties are dry to the touch in a few hours I never feel that its sufficient enough unless it dries overnight.
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#13 kylew

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 05:52 AM

 RoboSmurf, on Aug 11 2009, 08:57 AM, said:

I read most of the directions but I still feel more comfortable letting all my putties cure overnight. I use everything from green stuff, plumbers epoxy putty, milliput (different grades), mori mori, bondo, tamiya poly putty and tamiya basic putty.

Even though most putties are dry to the touch in a few hours I never feel that its sufficient enough unless it dries overnight.

With the polyester putty I use, it cures literally within 10 minutes depending on how much hardener I put in it.

I can cut in to it and carve/sand it without it going wrong. I've left it over night on a few occasions when I was burnt out, and it had no difference in workability.

I don't use modelling branded polyester putty though, I just buy a 1KG tin from the local automotive store.
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