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Nose cone weights?


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#1 kajnrig

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 11:26 PM

(Asking here instead of the scale model section because I figure this is where most of the remaining folks congregate anyhow.)

Hey, all. Found an old Revell 1/48 F-14D Tomcat kit on my shelf and decided to do a quick build of it. I was impressed by the size of it (the box lists it as 14" long with a 16" wingspan), and wanted to see how newer toolings of the kit looked, which led me to the Hasegawa 1/48 kit.

Why we're here: The Hasegawa kit instructs builders to add a 30g weight to the nose cone. Coming from mainly sci-fi robot kits, this struck me as odd. What is the purpose of this extra weight? Does it address some sort of balance issue? Is this a common requirement among scale airplane kits? What sort of materials could/should be used?

The Revell kit doesn't make any mention of adding a weight that I can see, but all the same, I found it interesting and thought I'd come here to get your input. Thanks.

(Also: I really want to get a 1/48 VF-1 or YF-19 now.)

#2 Twobad

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 02:45 AM

View Postkajnrig, on 25 January 2015 - 11:26 PM, said:

Does it address some sort of balance issue?

Exactly. In real life the front and middle-section of the plane are much heavier the the back-section so the undercarriage is constructed accordingly, which is not so much the case with plastic model-kits.
Basically you can use anything that does the job for you like bits of metal, screws or putty. For ref. here's a Plamo Tsukurou episode (check at 3:41).

https://www.youtube....h?v=Y2IxuHdgdqg

#3 kajnrig

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 05:24 PM

I ended up just watching that whole thing. "Macross Master." *snicker*

Thanks for the answer.

A followup question: People who have worked with raised panel lines, what strategies have you tried? I'm thinking maybe a reverse wash with very, very precise alcohol rubbing. Or else dry-brushing. Or even just sanding it all away if I have to; I want to avoid rescribing at all costs.

#4 Kiske

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 07:10 PM

Paint kit dark color then light color (or reversed) then use a fine sand paper (800+grit) and lightly brush the rasied lines until the paint shows through. Works best if your going for a weathered look. You may also be able to use a pink pencil eraser to remove the excess paint on the raised panel line.

Another way is to apply a matte/flat coat ontop of the paint and then use a colored pencil that is a similar shade and rub it on the raised panel line. You can also use regular graphite pencil if you want a grey/silvery look. Just remember to re topcoat it or it will smudge badly.

Revese sanding. Paint kit, then mix up darker color (over thin the paint so it is transparent) and lightly spay a coat over the entire surface. Then the flat areas (not the panel lines) with a fine grit. Only recc. on a weathered kit though.

Reverse wash works but IMO most kits with raised details are dated and likely won't have very sharp raised detail. Good luck.

This build (and many more of swanny's) may explain a bit more -involves reading :P- http://swannysmodels.../B17Ebuild.html

#5 kajnrig

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 12:34 AM

Pulled out a couple more kits, a 1/72 VF-1 and a 1/144 Yukikaze. Boy there's a lot of unfinished business here. The VF-1's been in storage well over ten years now with some parts painted in what I think are enamels. I've got all of that mess in a tub of Purple Power right now; will check on that after classes tomorrow. Some parts of it were superglued together, too: the head/turret, the gunpod, central fuselage w/ wings, the nose cone, the arms. I'd like to try and start fresh on this kit.

As for the Yukikaze, its main body was primed and for whatever reason puttied together. I'd like to strip this thing back to the bare plastic, too, but mostly I'd just like to get rid of the puttywork.

So a few questions:

1.) Can the Purple Power dissolve CA glue? (Doubt so, but there seem to be scattershot reports of it happening across the net.)
2.) What would be the most effective way of dissolving CA glue without harming the PS plastic? (I've read anything from freezing the affected pieces to prying the pieces apart and just hoping for the best.)
3.) What's an effective method of stripping primer? Specifically Rustoleum spray primer.
4.) What's an effective method of removing putty without damaging plastic?
5.) ...and finally, a curiosity: Are there such things as paint-on primers/clear coats? What are the pros and cons versus the more typical spray variety?

Thanks for the tips, Kiske. Lots of different strategies to try out. Maybe I'll use that F-14 as a testbed and then give it to the kids to play with after I'm done Frankensteining with it.

Edited by kajnrig, 30 January 2015 - 12:34 AM.


#6 electric_indigo

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 02:29 AM

View Postkajnrig, on 26 January 2015 - 05:24 PM, said:

People who have worked with raised panel lines, what strategies have you tried?

IMO the best strategy is to shell out the extra money for a modern kit with engraved panel lines, if that option exists.

I once went through the labor of engraving the 1/72 Matchbox/Revell kit of the Handley Page Victor, and this has cured my ambitions for good.

Otherwise, IMO, regardless of what you do about it, raised panel lines just spoil the kit.
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#7 kajnrig

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 06:13 AM

View Postelectric_indigo, on 30 January 2015 - 02:29 AM, said:

IMO the best strategy is to shell out the extra money for a modern kit with engraved panel lines, if that option exists.

I once went through the labor of engraving the 1/72 Matchbox/Revell kit of the Handley Page Victor, and this has cured my ambitions for good.

Otherwise, IMO, regardless of what you do about it, raised panel lines just spoil the kit.

Lol.

If I want to build another F-14, I'll probably go for the newer Hasegawa or Hobby Boss toolings - engraved panels, better parts fit (seriously this thing is hideous but it's old so eh), just loads better all around it seems - but this was in my inventory and is just to get me back into the swing of things. I'm not dedicating a lot of effort to this build, so if the raised panel lines turn out bad or even ruin the kit, oh well.

Edited by kajnrig, 30 January 2015 - 06:25 AM.


#8 kajnrig

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 09:31 PM

So. My VF-1 has a lot of superglue all over the place. Had fun scraping all that away. Apparently I had superglued the waterslide decal onto the painted instrument panel, which means Purple Power couldn't get rid of it, which means I had to sand everything away.

Now I have to reconstruct everything. Fun fun fun!

(large image, so spoiler tags)

Spoiler

The paint that remained after I sanded most everything away suggested a main viewscreen, which I reconstructed with some (0.1mm? 0.2?) styrene that I further sanded down. Might sand down even more, I dunno. Also scribed the two panel lines on the sides, as well as four hard-to-see ones that run from the bottom of the viewscreen straight down.

I didn't want to look at any source materials, just recreate the instrument panel using the residual paintwork and my imagination, but eventually I caved and checked out some reference art. The little square piece in the middle of the pic (might redo that...) will go to the right of the main viewscreen, recreating the number pad from reference pics. That'll be it for lineart reference, though. I might just texture the rest of the instrument panel with various bits of styrene, maybe add something to that central column. A flight stick, maybe? Or I might put those on the side panels, the way they are in the lineart GRAA;KLDSF;ALDJFLKA. Gah. I'll do something.

(Lots of really delicate work, though, at this small a scale. Sheesh, I can see now why people like bigger kits aside from just the bigger size.)

Anyway, as for the F-14, I'm gonna have to reconstruct its instruments as well, and there I have even less to go on. Some time over the years I misplaced the panels for both the pilot and RIO. But instead of recreating both, I'm thinking I'll just do the pilot's panel and completely remove the backseat. In its place I'll scratch some sort of AI computer-looking thing. Pipes and wiring and a housing. The fictional history of this thing could be that it's a testbed for VF-0/VF-1 AI systems, I suppose. You know. one of those art imitates life things. Poetic.

The Yukikaze I haven't touched yet. I'll get to that in due time, but these two are more than enough to occupy my spare time. I'll get a proper WIP thread started soon. Maybe. I'll try to get a better camera by then, too.

Any and all answers to the above questions would still be greatly appreciated. Thanks and adios, all.




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