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Sculpey III Casting


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#1 Guest_cwmodels_*

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 02:01 PM

I have been experimenting with finding ways to cast resin parts cheap and fast. One of the methods I found was by using Sculpey III as the mold. It will not give you a perfect casting but it can work as a one-off cast if you ever need to have spare parts done. It's also good way to not use and original kit if you want to kitbash.

I first tried out this methods casting a part for VF-17 several months ago and it worked out fairly well. Here is the thread on it:

http://www.hobbyfana...opic=6255&st=15

I then tried it again a few weeks ago with larger and more complicated pieces. Here are the materials I used:

Sculpey III - Easy to obtain online or find at any arts & craft store, even Wal-Mart carries it. This 10 pack color set is about $15.00 and enough for making multiple molds. I chose Sculpey III over Super Sculpey because it is softer and conforms to the resin parts more easily.

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Aquamend - This is a 2 part epoxy putty which is very similar to Tamiya Epoxy Putty (it was recommended to me by Mihochan). The only difference is that it hardens much faster (15 - 30 minutes). You can find it at Home Depot for $2.99. Dries rock hard but still relatively easy to carve and sand.

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Das - Air dry modeling clay. You can find this at Michael's for around $6.00 a pack. Dries rock hard, easy to carve and sand.

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#2 Guest_cwmodels_*

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 02:01 PM

I basically wrapped the original resin parts in Sculpey, baked it in an oven (275 degree for 20 minutes), then cut the mold in half before it completely cools to get the original resin part out. It is very important to cut the molds while it's hot because at this stage Sculpey still have some flexibility and you will be able to bend it slightly to remove the resin parts.

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Since Sculpey don't stick to resin it will not damage the original resin pieces. There may be some residue on it but you can clean it off very easily with water and a little scrubbing.

I then used some vegetable oil and coated the inside of the mold with it. This will work as a cheap mold release agent.

With Aquamend I simply mixed the 2 part Epoxy together and stuffed it into each half of the mold then pressed them together. Some force will be necessary to press both sides together tightly, but don't crush your mold. Also be sure not to overstuff the Epoxy Putty because then your mold will not fit/close properly. Wait for a day before you get the pieces out. I then reheat the mold in the oven again so it will become flexible enough to bend a bit. Some damage to the mold will occur when you remove the casted part and at best you can probably use it one more time before it is completely destroyed.

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I tested out Das air dry clay the same exact way but the result is slightly different. I found that the clay will not dry properly inside the mold (because air don't get in), so I had to gently remove one side of the mold, let that area dry first and then do the same with the other side. Over all it took almost 2 weeks for everything to dry properly. But the over all result is still pretty good.

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Both casting done with Aquamend and Das will require a bit of putty and sanding to get them to match the original. But it's still not bad over all. I recommend some testing on smaller piece before you use it to cast any larger parts.

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#3 skyboy

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 07:09 PM

That was awesome~ :o  thanks for share  :lol:

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 07:13 AM

Good find, Chi!  I think I'll try it out.  I'm always a sucker for some new modeling technique.

I was going to experiment with a way to make Magic Sculp thinner by adding something to it.  I don't know yet, but if I find a product that can make an epoxy resin thinner (not necessarily pourable) it can be pressed and worked into each mold half to capture the detail.

I also noticed in your post that the head piece had a line going from vertical.  This was no doubt caused by a fold line in the Sculpey III.  There is a product called liquid Sculpey available that could be poured over the original piece first, but I'm not sure how flexible it is.  I do know that the manufacturer calls it out as "easy to bond" to other Sculpey products.  That might mean that you could pour it over the piece to capture the detail, then build the bulk of the mold with the Sculpey III.

Don't yet know.  When I have time, I'll give it a shot.  


#5 Imaginos

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 08:31 AM

Blade Runner, on Dec 23 2005, 08:13 AM, said:

Good find, Chi!  I think I'll try it out.  I'm always a sucker for some new modeling technique.

I was going to experiment with a way to make Magic Sculp thinner by adding something to it.  I don't know yet, but if I find a product that can make an epoxy resin thinner (not necessarily pourable) it can be pressed and worked into each mold half to capture the detail.

I also noticed in your post that the head piece had a line going from vertical.  This was no doubt caused by a fold line in the Sculpey III.  There is a product called liquid Sculpey available that could be poured over the original piece first, but I'm not sure how flexible it is.  I do know that the manufacturer calls it out as "easy to bond" to other Sculpey products.  That might mean that you could pour it over the piece to capture the detail, then build the bulk of the mold with the Sculpey III.

Don't yet know.  When I have time, I'll give it a shot. 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


You been to Magic sculpts site at all lately? I believe it was on thier site or in one of the stores that sells MS that they have a very...hmm...gooey version thats kind of like vasoline or something that you could paint into a mold with a brush or trowl.

Also you could make ms a bit softer with water from what i recall, though its been some time since i've worked with ms.

#6 NozomiWhiteWolf

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 09:09 AM

Hmm there "seams" to be many inperfections (pun intended ;))
But this is awesome tho! We can cast copies of kits for practice or to try multiple color schemes...! I think liquid inject wud be best tho so there isnt the possibility of crushing the mold. Also there wouldn't be as many empty spots/air bubbles. Might have to try this sometime.... :D

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 09:51 AM

Quote

You been to Magic sculpts site at all lately? I believe it was on thier site or in one of the stores that sells MS that they have a very...hmm...gooey version thats kind of like vasoline or something that you could paint into a mold with a brush or trowl.

Also you could make ms a bit softer with water from what i recall, though its been some time since i've worked with ms.

Could you direct me to the site?  I looked on the MS site and found nothing like you had spoken of.

#8 Guest_cwmodels_*

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 09:59 AM

Yeah, the imprefection come from the sculpey not sticking to resin's surface too well. So there are areas where you see seams and dents.

But I think the air bubbles come from using oil as a release agent. I think it traps air, becasue when I did the recast for VF-17 (without oil) the surface came out very smooth.

#9 Kamui K

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 02:26 PM

Blade Runner, on Dec 23 2005, 12:51 PM, said:

Quote

You been to Magic sculpts site at all lately? I believe it was on thier site or in one of the stores that sells MS that they have a very...hmm...gooey version thats kind of like vasoline or something that you could paint into a mold with a brush or trowl.

Also you could make ms a bit softer with water from what i recall, though its been some time since i've worked with ms.

Could you direct me to the site?  I looked on the MS site and found nothing like you had spoken of.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I think I know what you're talking about.  It's called Magic Smooth, but it's very similiar to M. Sculpt in packaging since it's made by the same company.  I bought it by accident since the font and container size were nearly the same.  I got home after buying it only to realize I bought the wrong stuff, and since I already opened the tub, I can't return it.  I'm STILL trying to find a use for this stuff.  
<_<

I did a quick search online and it's commonly used for taxidermy (if that helps).  And the font is in red & green.

When mixed together, it's very goo-ey and sticky.  And is semi transparent like vaseline, but it sticks to everything it touches.  Though I haven't experimented on how to properly use this.  The only thing I could kinda make a use for this stuff is water effects for large dioramas.  
And it dries to a semi elastic plastic.  So you wouldn't want to sand with it.  (kinda like the water effects from Woodland scenics, but harder).  And I wouldn't say it's like a sturdy putty that you could sculpt with.  It's not clay or play dough like.

But I could see using this stuff as a filler for certain projects.  It's just getting it to coroporate without sticking to everything in sight.

http://www.sculpt.co...magicsmooth.htm

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 04:29 PM

Thanks for the link Kamui K!  I checked it out and tried to place an order, but their website isn't keeping items in the basket.  I'll call them next week.

I like the idea of the Magic Smooth, even though it's reported to stick to everything.  I think it would be a useful detail surface for recasting parts since I doubt it will stick to something brushed with mold release.  My idea is to use the Magic Smooth as a surface coat or "shell", and then fill in the bulk of the part with a lightweight material.


#11 lodger_001

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Posted 25 December 2005 - 08:32 PM

something else you might wanna try for quick throwaway molds is silicone putty.  If you've got a hobby lobby near you they've started carrying alumilite silicone putty for ~$20 for a 3/4 lb kit.  After their almost weekly 40% coupon its only $12, not a bad deal.

http://www.amazingmoldputty.com/

#12 MisaoMakimachi

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 12:25 PM

cwmodels, on Dec 23 2005, 06:59 PM, said:

But I think the air bubbles come from using oil as a release agent. I think it traps air, becasue when I did the recast for VF-17 (without oil) the surface came out very smooth.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



yea, when you put the oil you have to make it very slowly and have to put a thin oil layer, with a little brush or your fingers, then you won't get that disgusting air bubbles

this is a good mold!! ;D

#13 Capcom USA

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 12:21 PM

lodger_001, on Dec 25 2005, 11:32 PM, said:

something else you might wanna try for quick throwaway molds is silicone putty.  If you've got a hobby lobby near you they've started carrying alumilite silicone putty for ~$20 for a 3/4 lb kit.  After their almost weekly 40% coupon its only $12, not a bad deal.

http://www.amazingmoldputty.com/

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  Yeah. I saw that at hobby lobby with the recast your self kits. I fogot what the recast kit was called, but it wasn't expensive. On the box it states you can make copies of coins, action figure,etc. So it might be good.

#14 Less_than_Super_Ostrich

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:45 AM

Wouldn't the heat of the oven hurt the original resin piece??

#15 Guest_cwmodels_*

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:31 PM

Less_than_Super_Ostrich, on Jan 17 2006, 01:45 PM, said:

Wouldn't the heat of the oven hurt the original resin piece??

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



It'll make the resin soft but no real damage would come to it once it cools off.




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